War in the Air - Assignment Example

The war in the air played a major part in the wining of the war because it helped Britain and allies to spot enemy movements and spot artillery. But these planes had there draw backs because they were slow moving and could not see through cloud cover because they could not get too low because they may have been hit by enemy fire.

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The first time these planes were used in a major battle was in the battle of the Somme. These planes were used to spot German artillery, Britain were trying to break the stalemate between the two sides.

The home front

During the First World War the British government told the British public they are directly involved in the war. At the beginning of the war the British public wanted to be apart of it and the war was treated with enthusiasm. But as soon as some of the horrific stories of battles and the deaths of soldiers came home the enthusiasm died away. The public soon didn’t want to go and fight on the frontlines but still wanted to be apart of the war and serve their country. People began to talk about fighting on the home front. On august 8th 1914 parliament passed the defence of the realm act. This act was designed to keep morale up in Britain and regulate life on the home front by sending constant supplies of munitions, weapons, clothes, equipment and food.

Another act was also passed DORA. This had four main points.

People were not allowed to talk about the armed forces or their operations in public, or spreading rumours. Also news papers were censored.

The ringing of church bells was forbidden unless Britain was under attack.

DORA allowed the government to take over any factory that produced weapons or war materials, this was used to increase efficiency. British summer time was introduced to increase working hours on farms.

In a bid to make people do more work pub hours were cut and the selling or consuming of brandy or whisky became illegal.

The need for food had increased in Britain so much so that public parks and many other open spaces had been turned into allotments. Between 1914-18 1.2 million hectares had been ploughed so that vegtables can be own.

When war broke out over 3,000,000 men joined up. Conscription for women was then introduced so that they could take over their husband’s jobs.