The New York Times - Assignment Example

An article was published in The New York Times by Max Roosevelt titled “Student Expectations Seen as Causing Grades Disputes. ” The focus of this editorial was to highlight what is often seen as a disruption to grades and our educational system. Many students these days feel they are entitled to higher grades because they did what was only expected of them which do not involve the greatest effort. In my opinion, a student that subjects themselves to minimum effort should receive the minimum grade without any complaints.

In past experience, I have realized that students fail to recognize their creative abilities which cause typical mind-sets and projections. Professor Marshall Grossman of the University of Maryland presumes that he will receive complaints whenever he returns assignments to students; many feel as though they are privileged in this manner. Grossman’s point is outlined relatively throughout the article, providing useful information through personal experience based on his observations.

A recent study by researchers at the University of California, Irvine, highlights his objective whereas 40 percent of surveyors believe that they should receive a B just for completing the required reading. I am convinced that the pressure to join the workforce at an early age and continue employment throughout college is a huge distraction to many students of today. People don’t see this as an accomplishment anymore because it is expected; most students are employed at some point during their education placing a burden on the student.

According to Professor Ellen Greenberger, the lead author of the study called “Self-Entitled College Students: Contributions of Personality, Parenting, and Motivational Factors,” believe that parental pressure, competition amongst peers & a heightened sense of achievement anxiety as also to blame for student’s sense of entitlement. I can attest to the pressures of society to succeed this is, however, no reason to become an undeveloped learner.

There are many students that assume they displayed effort and are deserving of a higher grade which can complicate what is identified as standard level of work since they not focused on quality. James Hogge, associate dean of the Peabody School of Education at Vanderbilt University said: “Students often confuse the level of effort with the quality of work. ” In accordance with Dean Hogge and based on this criteria, I believe that students are not delivering quality assignments making it difficult to attain the level of effort needed to surpass your classes.

Aaron M. Brower, the vice provost for teaching and learning at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, concludes that we have become “ultra- efficient in test preparation” and it “stems from K-12 experiences. ” I do believe that there are some downfalls within grade school and junior high, this kind of statements can be indicated as victimization. To consent to a belief that our educational system is anyway forsaking our children of essential qualities would belittle America’s educational guidance.

I don’t think that we can be so broad in regards to an important aspect of American culture, most students become ultra efficient because of time restraints; this does not determine a minimal understanding or the cause of low student effort. Roosevelt brilliantly highlights the opinions of various professors through the country without conducting an argument. I am impressed with his ability to feature each professor and be detailed without overshadowing any others.

Seminars that re-teach individuals and re-connect them to life is evidence that this can be reverse but “attributing the outcome of a failure to someone else” is never the answer. Although you can make the effort to outline specific details in our syllabus, sometimes this is enough, a student must go beyond what is only instructed and show purpose. Jason Greenwood, a senior kinesiology major at the University of Maryland mirror

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