Television advertisement - Assignment Example

I am analysing the television advertisement for the Dunhill London Fragrance for Men. This advert uses many different techniques to try and persuade their target audiences to buy their product. They want the audience to believe that their product is superior to any competitors’ products, and they use a variety of techniques to do this. This advert is trying to persuade you to buy Dunhill’s newly launched London Fragrance for Men. There are a number of ways they go about doing this.

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They use audience segmentation right from the start of the advert; they use very masculine colours like dark blues and silvers to attract a male audience, in addition they use a man to appear in the advert to appeal to men. This man is around 25-35 in age, so I think this is a good indicator of whom the product is intended for. I believe he is of this age because I think he holds a powerful position in his company, as he wears smart clothes and his confident body language expresses he knows his way around his business, so would be rather experienced.

He has not just started in work, as his body language is not timid or frightened, and he just by the way he walks you can tell he has been around for a while. The advert uses rapid editing, which is never really focusing on one particular area for any length of time, the exception to this, is when a wide shot is used of the man and helicopter over a famous part of London. This rapid change could represent the fast paced city lifestyle: nothing hangs around for long! The images it uses are of famous landmarks within the capital.

It shows: a wide shot of the city and the River Thames, Tower Bridge, the Gherkin (both a wide shot and a bird’s eye view), St Paul’s Cathedral and the London Eye. Considering the fragrance is called Dunhill London Fragrance you can see why Dunhill chose to put all the famous landmarks into the advert. They are something the public can identify and relate to. The advert begins with a man coming out of a building that looks very old and because of the high columns and sign and coat of arms on the doorway is a Court of Law, he is being portrayed as a lawyer.

The advert uses a range of shots and landmarks to connect with the audience and make them think of the Fragrance when they see the places. This use of a lawyer shows in socio-economics that this advert is aimed at the ‘A’s and ‘B’ s on the JICNAR scale in society, because the people in society that are in the A and B category are people with very well paid jobs and they usually work in city environments (where this advert is set), and as it advertises itself as a luxury item that men in good jobs and with good clothes should have.

Combined, they make up around 25% of the population so this, again, is another type of audience segmentation. The class system is also included partially in the JICNAR scale; this advert is aimed at they very higher classes, the Upper Class and the Middle Class. I appeals to these classes because of the use of a helicopter which is usually used a type of transport by the very rich as you need highly qualified pilots and the helicopter has always shown an image of higher class transport.

If you looked at the advert by judging the audience on their economical position then I think the very top band of people would be interested in this product. However there are other methods of analysing this advert, one includes looking at Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. This product would be aimed into the top of the Hierarchy of Needs, self-actualisation, because of its luxury status and it not being something essential for life within the lower levels of the Hierarchy, e. g. basic needs and safety.

The man in this advert has diamond cufflinks, smart clothes and shows him being picked up from the top of an executive building by helicopter, this leads the audience to believe that this man has a top job and is very successful, this in itself incorporates the idea of self-actualisation. Men want to imagine themselves as attractive, successful and that this advert is intended to make the consumer believe they can become this man with his executive lifestyle by using the fragrance.

Thinking of Maslow’s theory, this advert is aimed in the top sector, at self-actualisation, which is all about people wanting to imagine themselves as the person in an advert, as though they can become this person with their good looks or experiences by buying the product. In this advert the audience want to imagine themselves becoming the successful lawyer with the good looks and the, suggested, good lifestyle. Another theory developed by Young and Rubicam is to do with Cross Cultural Consumer Characteristics (the 4 Cs), and doesn’t concern where the consumer is from or their culture but what type of person they are.

They believed there were seven types of consumer and I believe that this advert is aimed at: the explorers, because their core need in life is for discovery so this new product would be a new experience that has not been available before so would appeal to them; the aspirers, as their need in life is for status and as visual gloss is highly attractive to aspirers, this product is perfect because it brands itself as a luxury fragrance group so would instantly give you a status amongst others; the succeeders, because their core need in life is control, and they often seek out the best products in the market because they feels it is only what they deserve so this luxury item is one of the best in the market so is highly appealing. I think this advert is aimed specifically at aspires, even though it may be attractive to other types of consumer. I think it is aimed at aspirers because for them having a particular brand shows off what kind of a person you are.

In the advert there is a close-up of the man doing up his diamond cufflinks showing that he can afford expensive stones such as diamonds for ordinary clothing that normal people would just have plastic or metal. So this luxury product shows people that you have a little more money than most to be able to have such a high-class item. Aspirers want to create a sense of desire for others to want to be like them. Young and Rubicam’s theory presents a variety of different consumers, but is mostly aimed at people that want to be admired by others and want to have a sense of status amongst others. This advert uses different persuasive techniques to attract an audience.

It is very much centred on the idea of a psychological reward; it will make you feel successful if you wear this fragrance and it makes you feel good wearing the product because the man in the advert looked successful so is it not true that this product will make me successful and handsome because I wear the fragrance as well? The psychological ‘punishment’ for not purchasing the product is making you feel that you are not successful and you do not have a good job. Moreover, repetition of dark blues and silvers are used all the way through Dunhill’s fragrance adverts, as backdrops and in a variation of the Union Jack Flag towards the end of the advert to get people to make the connection of the colours with the product; not just TV and cinema moving adverts but in print adverts as well. The same logo is used in all of their products.

The combination of these two repetitions is a device used to make things stick in the audience’s head so that they are reminded of the brand when they see the logo or particular colours. This advert uses an attractive man to make the product attractive. Dunhill want to make men think that they can become handsome by using this fragrance and want women to go and buy this product for their partner as they think it will make their partner more attractive. Other companies like Davidoff Fragrances use handsome men and women in their advertising campaigns, it is very normal for fragrance companies advertising men and women’s fragrances to use attractive models with scenes of a sexual nature because it is a proven successful way of selling the product.

Furthermore, adverts in this genre are usually centred on a person, not the product; they try to sell a type of lifestyle that this product will bring. There is not usually any spoken parts in fragrance adverts, apart from a small part at the end describing the brand and the fragrance’s name. There is almost always some type of music to attract a particular audience. Judging from the normal conventions of fragrance adverts this Dunhill fragrance advert ticks complies with the general trend in fragrance advertising. This advert uses ‘time and space savers’, like stereotypes to let the audience make immediate judgements about people based and on their appearance and surroundings. In this advert the man is a stereotypical city worker.

He works in a high-class job and has a good wage. All this can be determined within the first few seconds of the advert. The views of the city, smart clothes and businessman-like body language all lead us to believe he is in a good job and has enough money to buy these kinds of clothes. The building he emerges from is also portrayed as a stereotypical Court of Law with the signs and Coat of Arms on the archways. This is a way of letting the audience just accept this is the situation and do not wait to question the idea. The mise-en-scene leads us to believe this as well, being set in London (the capital city) also enforces the city lifestyle.

Stereotypes in this advert enforce themes and the man’s image without much questioning from the audiences and companies don’t have to waste money explaining who a person is, as they can use stereotypes to make this judgement based on how they look. Music in this advert is a way of directing the advert to a specific audience. This advert has electric guitars; drum kits and keyboard to produce a musical effect that is appealing to young men. The music has a lively tempo and is very upbeat but also has an element of repetition as it repeats the same track over and over for the 40-second duration of the advert, the exception being towards the end where it builds to a lively point.

This could represent the tediousness of the audience’s current job and this fragrance can make your life exciting, as the music gets livelier towards the end of the advert when the fragrance is shown. The music in this advert reflects the potential audience and lifestyle that they could achieve if they bought the product. I believe this product is a luxury item that is aimed at the male higher class in society and at aspirers in particular as they crave the sense of being admired. This product makes you seem well off and successful. The advert uses a huge range of persuasive techniques to get the product to appeal to their target audience and it fits well into its genre.