How the Jews were discriminated against by The Nazi’s in Germany in 1939 - Assignment Example

The Jews were discriminated against by Nazi’s pretty much straight away after Hitler cam to power in Germany. One of Hitler’s first tasks was to demand a boycott of all Jewish owned businesses for a day. He set this up within months of him become head governor. This was the starting point in terms of hatred towards Jews, and was one of the main reasons that the discrimination was as bad as it was in 1939.

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Possibly the most important event in the lead up to 1939 was Krystallnacht, or “The Night of Broken Glass” as it is roughly translated. This event occurred in November of 1938, and was night of mass destruction caused to Jewish shops, synagogues and Jewish homes. Roughly 100 Jews were killed, and many more were injured on this tragic night. Fire fighters were on hand at each of the major fires at synagogues, but were told not to put the fires out unless they became to out of control. This led to a vast number of Jews leaving Germany and moving to a different country altogether. England was included in the list of countries, and allowed 10,000 Jewish children to live in safety from the Nazis.

There was, however, a period during these 6 years when the violence calmed down for a while. This was during the Olympics, which were being held in Berlin. The reason for the lack of anti-Semitic behaviour during this time was because the world’s eyes were going to be watching over Germany, therefore they didn’t want to make it blatantly obvious that something was happening. Also during this times, many of the Jews thought the hatred had stopped and that they could live their lives normally again. However, once the games were over, the discrimination started again, and was worse that ever.

The Nazi’s also attempted to remove the Jews from Social life. They tried to reach this goal by, amongst many other things, creating the Nuremburg race laws. These laws were set up on September 15th 1935, and excluded German born Jews from Reich citizenship, as well as banning any relationships, sexual or otherwise, between Jews and Germans. The Germans also took over the Jewish business, which was supposed to “Aryanise” the German economy. Jews were also forced to have a red “J” stamped onto their passports, so that people who checked them knew that they were a Jew. Some of the Jews were made to change their names to either “Israel” for the males, or “Sara” for the females. These were identified as Jewish names, and therefore the German police could easily tell who was a Jew.

Therefore, the violence and hatred aimed at Jews started as soon as Hitler came to power, and slowly built and built. This did calm down however, during the 1936 Olympics being held in Germany. But the violence was still as strong as ever once the games were over. The Jews were treated very harshly by 1939, and many were sent to concentration camps for “re-learning”. However, most of these Jews worked as slave labour, and then were killed in the large gas chambers in huge groups.